Erica Kohler – Residential Realtor At Hall & Hunter Realtors

AGT 16 | Residential Realtor
9
Mar

Erica Kohler – Residential Realtor At Hall & Hunter Realtors

Are Realtors going to become obsolete because everything’s electronic? Jordan Levin’s guest for this episode has something interesting to say about this. Erica Kohler is a licensed residential Realtor at Hall & Hunter Realtors. Erica discusses with Jordan how online listings are not always accurate. Zillow, Redfin, Trulia, and such don’t understand the unique market and neighborhood of the property as much as the Realtors do. Join in the conversation and get valuable updates about real estate during this COVID-19 pandemic. You’ll also get to hear Erica’s experiences through abuse and divorce and how she’s using it to help others who find themselves in a similar situation. Tune in!

Listen to the podcast here:

Erica Kohler – Residential Realtor At Hall & Hunter Realtors

Welcome to the show. Good things start with you and good habits. You are the driving force. CrossFit Bloomfield in Bloomfield, Michigan, is the perfect place to enable consistent optimal lifestyle changes that elevate and strengthen the body and mind of the whole family. Visit us at CrossFitBloomfield.com. Just a spark can strike fire. Good things are sparked with inspiration. I’m here to provide inspiration at work, corporate events or fundraising to improve time management, promote productivity and elevated a positive work environment. Looking for consistent and manageable lifestyle changes? Come find me. Visit us at JordanLevin.com. I’d like to welcome one of my good friends, Erica Kohler, who I have known for quite a number of years. Thank you, Erica, for being here.

Jordan, it’s great to see you, too. I’m happy to be here and be part of this show. Thanks.

You are one of the first people when I first started the show that I knew I want to get in touch with because we’ve talked multiple times through the years and I believe your story is also quite inspirational in a different aspect because you are such a go-getter. You are so adamant about getting results, not just for yourself personally but for everybody else around you. I’ve watched you at the gym and you are positive about everything. You’re encouraging of everybody. That makes me think, “You must be doing that outside of your own fitness career.”

Thanks, Jordan. I appreciate that. Being part of CrossFit Bloomfield has been a real benefit and blessing in my life because of the people that I’ve met, the coaching I’ve gotten but also how it’s pushed me and challenged me in my life. I have an amazing mom who was part of my life and she’s now in heaven but she taught me to always look at the positive, always look at things the glass half full and to see what can I give, what can I give back to other people. It’s more important to what impact am I going to have so I try to do that wherever I go.

I’m curious. We’re talking about health and wellness. What got you involved? You said your mother was a big driving force. What was it about health and wellness that made you decide to make it a priority?

I’ve always been an athlete. I’ve always been involved in sports my whole life. I was a downhill skier from the time I was probably four, always loved sports and being active, skied all through high school competitively and at that point started getting into more form and lifting to get stronger. I did softball and field hockey. I was always involved in competitive sports. In college, I found it as a great way as a stress reliever and found myself wanting to get healthier.

AGT 16 | Residential Realtor

Residential Realtor: You can’t change those things from the past but if you dwell on those it will not allow you to move forward.

Through high school, I had a couple of challenges in my life. My parents went through a divorce. I decided I’d rebel in a lot of different ways, got myself in some trouble, wasn’t eating healthy, wasn’t taking care of myself and found myself at a place where I was sitting and asking myself the question, “Is this the kind of life I want to live? Is this the role model I want to be?” I knew at that point I had wanted to be a teacher and where I was sitting and what I was doing, the thought went through my head, “No principal is going to hire me if this is the life I’m living and role model I’m being.” I said, “I need to make some changes.”

I had dropped out of college at that point. I went back into college and started making some life changes, differences in my health and habits. I started to change my habits and started to self-teach. I was going to the gym at the school and was reading articles. At that time, there wasn’t internet. I was reading magazines and different articles and getting involved in some of the classes that they offered and I found I enjoyed it. As I developed my skill and started getting healthier, I saw how clear my mind was and how much better I could focus. I was introduced to a holistic doctor who helped me discover I had some food allergies, which were infringing on my health. I started getting those in order.

As my body and health started to change, people started asking me what’s the difference. I teach so I naturally like to share knowledge. It was great to help other people. I started going to a gym when I lived in Canton when I was married and had babies. I had three kids under three and I was going to the gym. One the trainers there was like, “You might want to go try this place in Ann Arbor.” I found that it was a CrossFit affiliate. I never got involved but it stuck in my head. When I moved back to Bloomfield, I got involved at CrossFit Bloomfield and that competitive nature in me got sparked again, that competitive skier. I was a state-level skier and a future skilled hockey player so I was always super competitive. I love that part of CrossFit but I love the family aspect, too. It’s a competition but it’s a collaborative competition. It’s not a cutthroat competition.

Always look at the positive, look at the glass half full, and see what you can give back to other people.

Even as people are growing and developing, they’re growing stronger. Somebody might do a workout faster or lift more weight than me but they’re beating their own personal best. I’m as excited for them for beating their personal best as they are for me. That’s what I love about it. It is a competition with yourself. That sparked my greater desire to get healthier and get more fit, set some weight lifting goals and some training goals and things and then I discovered I loved helping other people do it. I started getting into some health coaching and training. I loved that and that’s been a side passion of mine along with my career for all these years. That’s how.

What I love about what you said is the whole education aspect. You did drop out which is fine but you educated yourself. That takes a tremendous amount of willpower and dedication to your own personal trying to figure out how to exclude the external factors that are going around and focus on yourself. When you make that a priority, everything else falls into place.

You can’t change what happens to you, you can only change how you respond to it. That’s all I have control over and how I respond. What I realized at that point when I was nineteen was that I was taking all these circumstances that had happened to me and letting them define my life instead of stopping and saying, “I can’t change that. I can’t change what they did.” All I can do is say, “How am I going to learn from that, grow and move forward?” I did. I went back to school. I got two degrees in Education and Psychology, graduated magna cum laude so it was a great turnaround for me. It goes back to that whole thing of you can’t change what other people do. You can’t control how they decide to live and what they decide to do. All I can do is control how I respond. That’s been the whole story of my life. I’ve had a couple of pretty major shifts and major changes in my life that became that driving question of what life do I want to live? What legacy do I want to leave?

I commend you for that. I can’t say it enough because due to my position now with real estate and when I think back at that, there are so many different changes you’ve gone through. I think most people will have a hard time with that and beat themselves down. Don’t get me wrong. I do it too and I know we all do beat ourselves up but it’s a matter of how quickly do we bounce back from that self-beating up. There’s nothing wrong with doing that. It’s a matter of recognizing and then moving forward from that.

Surrounding myself with people who I know are going to support me. I’ll never forget the day that I found out my mom had cancer. I walked into the CrossFit gym and I was like, “Give me a workout that is going to kick my butt and it has to have ball slams.” Ball slams have always been the one exercise that I relieve stress because I can throw that ball as fricking hard as I can against the floor. It gets out all that adrenaline and all that stress. To have a community where I can come in and be like, “Today sucked. I need to throw a barbell around and get out that stress.” Intention is great. It is all about mindset.

We talked about how I walked out of some tough situations. I was in a pretty destructive marriage and it was damaging. I stood in the kitchen of the apartment that we were living in and I looked at my two babies. I was pregnant with my youngest, my middle one was eighteen months old and my oldest was two and a half. I called my dad because of a very difficult situation. I said to him, “I don’t want to get a phone call in 30 years from one of my daughters because of what I’ve taught them is okay to be treated by a husband.” He said, “What do you need from me?” He helped me and he walked me through that situation. He helped me get out of that situation.

There was a lot over the next years that I realized I had to work through emotionally because I’ve been pretty badly emotionally beat up, psychologically abused and beaten down that I had to work through. Going to CrossFit helped me do that. Surrounding myself with people who believed in me like when I didn’t believe I could do something, they were like, “Yeah, you can. Sure, you can.” They pushed me to try. A lot of that fear that’s in your head is telling me, “I shouldn’t even try. I can’t even try.” If you could shut that voice up for ten and try, you’d be amazed how much you can do. I remember I had a goal to do a 300-pound deadlift. I was getting to 250, 275, 295, 298 and when I finally got to 303, I left the gym that day and I was like, “I can do anything.” I knew there was nothing that was going to hold me back.

AGT 16 | Residential Realtor

Residential Realtor: It’s important to have a specialized Realtor who does know your unique market because of those nuances.

It was one of those moments that it was a mental barrier that was broken in my mind that sometimes we need those with working out. Sometimes we need those in areas where it relates to one area of our life and then we can take that and apply it to everything else. That was impactful for me. When we face those moments when I had that conversation with my dad, I had a choice. I could stay or I can make a different choice. I will tell you it was scary because I didn’t know what to expect. I had a life plan that I thought was going to be in place if I stayed on that path. Now all of a sudden, I was completely stopping that path and going to a totally different one. Having the courage to do that, doing things like CrossFit, being around people who see in me things that I don’t always see in me is what I need.

There’s a phrase that’s called, “Iron sharpens iron.” It’s a scripture from the Old Testament. We have to be around people that sharpen us. The best way to sharpen a sword is with another sword. How do you sharpen a knife? With another blade, with steel. You have to take something of the same substance, of the same focus and the same caliber that will sharpen you. Surrounding myself with people who do that and putting myself in situations where I’m challenged and they challenged me is what makes me better and what makes me stronger.

The biggest thing that I’m getting from this is number one, having the right support system. I think people need to understand that it’s okay to ask for help. I think people are even embarrassed to ask for help or to seek out someone that they know to have a discussion. If they don’t know the answers, perhaps somebody else does. I think that’s what we need to understand and learn from that aspect of it.

I think it’s made me better as a mom and in my career. I hope it’s made me better as a friend and all those things.

It’s so easy to tell ourselves to remain positive. I try to wake up every morning before I get out of bed. I sit at the edge of the bed or the side of the bed. For about 30 seconds, I don’t think about anything. I take a couple of deep breaths. I’m like, “This is back up to today. Enjoy it. Make it the best day I can,” and then I move on. Since I’ve been doing that, I feel so much better throughout the day because I made sure that there’s no negative thoughts that are on my day and then move from there. Do you have anything that you do on a daily basis, to recalibrate or reset?

I do. I’m a Christian and my faith is extremely important to me. I believe that Jesus is my savior and he walks with me every day. I spend about 45 minutes to an hour every morning, praying, reading and journaling, talking with him and getting direction for my day. A lot of that is letting go of stuff from the day before and listening to him of how to direct my path. I was thinking how every day if I sit and say, “What am I supposed to do?” Get centered, seek him and seek his wisdom. I do those things. My days run so much smoother. My days seem to fall into place a lot easier. I would say that that is probably the most important thing and remembering who he is.

The other thing that I’ve learned is how important forgiveness is. I know so many people that are carrying things each day, from 2021, 2015 or from the past that they can’t change. You can’t change those things from the past but if I dwell on those and I stay in those, it will not allow me to move forward. Forgiving other people, releasing them, letting it go, understanding that 99% of the time people do things for their own reasons because of their own stuff, you’re just the unlucky recipient of it and letting go, letting them be, releasing them and not trying to control or not trying to find revenge. Those kinds of things give me so much more peace and so much more peace of mind.

Remembering that in my faith, I live for an audience of one. I live before God and the life that he wants me to live and the way that he wants me to serve other people and be in a relationship with other people. As long as I can put my head on the pillow every night before him and say, “Lord, I may not be perfect. Thank you for your grace and I did all that I could to honor you, serve you and show your love to this world then I feel like it’s been a good day.” I know that he takes care of all the details.

I like that aspect because each person has the own way of going about doing good. Each way is a very special way for that person. People need to understand that you need to be able to talk to yourself, be somebody else in that aspect. To be able to say, “This is how it’s going to go from there.” Let’s talk about the real estate stuff a little bit. You were in real estate back in the ‘90s and then you stopped doing that. You did some other stuff and then recently got back into it. What I’m curious about is what’s the difference in real estate back then to how things are now? Maybe even specifically with the pandemic, what do you think some of the differences at how the market is in a sense?

Surround yourself with people you know are going to support you.

It’s like night and day. That is a huge question. I’ll do my best to answer briefly but I’ll talk about probably the latest years. In 1996, I recently graduated from high school. I worked with my parents who are broker-owners of a company and did a lot of their marketing, open houses and a lot of the backend stuff. I learned the nuts and bolts of how real estate works. Back then in ‘96, everything was still on paper. We have carbon copy listings and listing sheets that had five copies. There was no internet. There was no Realcomp, Zillow and Trulia.

There were books that were about this thick that were black and white. There were six listings to a page. You’d have this house and you had a square about 2.5 inches x 3 inches on a page that you could put everything about the house, the room sizes, the square footage, the number of stories and then a little blurb about all the details and that was what we had. They were these white books you would take them. You’d meet with a client. You’d take a book into a room and they’d say, “I want to look at these houses.” You’d have to call the agent and say, we want to see it. This is the time. Sometimes you had to go pick up keys at offices. It was a different world. When you wrote an offer, you had to sign six copies. You’d have to make six copies because everybody had to have an original. During that period is when faxing started to take place and people are now allowed for electronic copies with faxes. Still for closing, you still had to have a wet signature for each listing for each a copy of the contract.

Now you fast forward, we’ve got Zillow, Redfin, Realtor.com, MLS Realcomp which is the service that we use where all of our listings go live and then all those services pull from. It’s a different world that we’re living in now. Everything is electronic signatures. We even do virtual closings. Title companies in Michigan are now allowed to do virtual closings over the computer. One of my clients relocated back home to Australia and the house didn’t sell until after he moved. He was able to close from Australia.

It’s interesting. I want to address this because the market is a complete seller’s market at the same time, people have asked the question, “Are realtors going to become obsolete? Are they still needed? We’ve got Zillow and Redfin. Everything’s electronic.” You do have Zillow, Realtor.com, Redfin and Trulia but they’re not as accurate. I’ll give you an example. I have a potential client who lives in a neighborhood over by Bloomfield Open Hunt Club. If you’re not from Michigan, Bloomfield Open Hunt Club is a country club in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan and right behind it, I believe they sold some of their property to a developer. There are about 25 or 30 lots that are between $2 million and $3 million homes, really nice, beautiful estates that are custom homes. Some are $2 million, $3 million or even $3.5 million or $4 million. It’s really beautiful.

One of them sold last spring and this client that I’m potentially listing their house, if you look at the listings in their neighborhood, their house is probably going to sell between $425,000 and $475,000 depending on the market, time of the year, what improvements they do. It will be somewhere in that range. However, if you go to Zillow, Zillow lists their house as $670,000 value. It’s because Zillow doesn’t understand the unique market and that the neighborhood of Hunt Club Estates right next to this subdivision is a completely different caliber of home. All they do is they take the numbers, stick it into their formulas and that’s how they come up with their averages.

They’re both four-bedroom homes, three full bathrooms and basements. One is a 1970s or 1960s-built quad-level and one is a 2005-built, 5,000-square foot colonial. It’s apples and oranges but Zillow doesn’t know that. As a realtor, knowing this unique market, it’s important to have a specialized realtor who does know your unique market because of those nuances. If you’re in Birmingham, Cortland Lake Estates versus Bloomfield Village versus the Rail District. They are three different types of homes, three different neighborhoods and have different price points accordingly. That’s one of the things that I’m noticing a lot is the importance of having your specialized realtor in your area.

When I look at what’s happened in this pandemic, I will never forget the conversation I had with a colleague. It was the Friday, before July 4 and we both were at the office and we said, “Have a great holiday.” He randomly asked me, “What do you think it’s going to be like next week?” Traditionally, here in Michigan, we are still very much an automotive industry-dominated area. Typically, for years, when they did their shutdowns, the big three did their shutdowns in the first two weeks of July, everything got super quiet and real estate got super quiet. Real estate still is quiet right around July 4th and usually around the 10th or 12th of July, it starts to pick up again.

He and I were talking right before July 4th and we’re like, “What do you think is going to happen?” He and I were like, “It’s a crapshoot.” It could shut down. We could be quiet looking at everything coming out of a pandemic. People might be saying, “I’m holding onto my money. I’m not moving. I’m going to renovate. I’m going to stay where I’m at. There’s too much uncertainty.” People might say, “This is the time. It’s summer. It’s warm. We don’t know if we’re going to get shut down again. Everything I plan to do in the next year, I’ve got to do in the next eight weeks.” Lo and behold, we came out of July 4th like gangbusters and it’s been nonstop ever since. We’ve had some of the best months in real estate.

What we’re seeing now is a seller’s market to the Nth degree. It’s funny. I talked to my colleagues and were like, “We’ve got buyers, 6 buyers, 8 buyers and we’re looking for houses. If I could make a house appear, you’d have ten offers because there are a few listings. It’s an interesting market. It makes it a lot of fun. It tests your patience. Buyers now and I’ve heard it across the country so if I could give any advice to a buyer, I would say, “Be patient.” Slow and steady wins the race. This is a marathon, not a sprint. Don’t get caught up in FOMO and buy something that you’re going to regret. It’s okay to let something go. It’s okay to take a little bit of a longer time. I do understand some people are under the gun because of relocation. Life changes. They have a time limit. That’s okay. I’m a firm believer that when you need it, the right house will appear. You have to be patient. Trust your realtor.

We, as realtors, are doing a lot more deals working one-on-one with each other. There’s a lot of stress when you have multiple offers. We do have a lot of before-market deals happening and a lot of sellers saying, “I don’t want 100 people coming through my house in two days. If you’ve got a buyer or someone in your office has a buyer, let’s do the deal and get it done.” We’re seeing a lot of that. Having a realtor with good relationships with their colleagues in the community is important but be patient. If you’re a seller and you are considering selling property values, I think on average are 15% to 18% higher in 2021 than in 2020.  We’ve seen double-digit increases in prices in years and with the low inventory, it’s not going to change. This is a prime time to sell. The market is fun. It’s challenging me as a realtor to grow and get creative in finding houses for my clients. It’s challenging buyers to be creative and look outside the box to find the right house so it’s a lot of fun.

AGT 16 | Residential Realtor

Residential Realtor: Never think that you can’t have an impact in this world because even just one life you impact for the better, you’re making a difference.

I’m with you in that because I always get the MLS listings into my mail. Before the pandemic, I was getting 4, 5 or 6 a day. Now, I’m getting maybe one every couple of days. A buddy of mine bought a house. There were 22 showings in one day when he put the offer in, he overbid and got it. It’s crazy to me. The interest rates are so low now that the combined mortgage of the house for the same amount of money in 2020 or 2019 so that’s part of that. What I’ve learned, I used to be a real estate agent in Florida back in 2005. I learned in South Florida. That South Florida real estate market at that time was insane. There were all these high rises but then after that, the market is still going down, after then there was too much inventoryNow I think it went back up in Miami.

I think a lot of people say, “Is this going to be another 2006?” Since you brought that up, I’ll address it. I’ve talked to a couple of mortgage brokers that I work with on a regular basis. I’ve asked them the same question simply because I’m getting that question from my buyers and sellers. They’ve said, the difference we have now is people have a ton of equity in their houses, which they didn’t have in 2005 in 2006. People were mortgaged to the very top. They’d have 95% mortgage or 98% of the value of the house was mortgaged, whereas now people have 30%, 40% or even 50% equity in their house. It’s a total difference. There’s a lot more money that they have in value in the house that if they sold, they’re not going to be underwater.

There is a big difference there. There were some laws passed allowing people that had gone through forbearance that they can refinance, which is a real relief because at first, they couldn’t. Now people can take some of that equity out of their homes that they weren’t allowed to before that law was passed. If they did fall on hard times in 2020, they can hopefully use some of that equity to maybe pay off some debt or get themselves back whole financially and not lose their house. That’s my hope. I don’t have a crystal ball. Everything’s speculation. We don’t know what the next years will bring. We don’t know. I was talking to somebody about COVID and health and we don’t know what the outcome is going to be. We have to make the best decisions we can and trust it works out. It always does somehow, Jordan.

Everything always happens for a reason. I always try to believe that. There are so many things in life and you have to be able to trust your own intuition. Sometimes you’re not always right but if you take the information that you gather from other people and that’s my whole point. All good things start with you. It’s you are making that point in decision in this whole aspect. I have a question for you. What would the advice you’d give for the Erica from years ago?

That could be a loaded question. You’re getting more than you bit off but I’m going to say. In March of 2001, I was four months from getting married. I’m going to tell you. That spring, I asked myself, this little voice came through my head and said, “Are you sure you want to marry him? I don’t think you should marry him.” I felt a lot of reluctance marrying my husband and then this other little voice said to me, “If you don’t marry him, who would marry you?” That was the belief that I had about myself then and because of my own doubt of my own worth, I really am a woman who is strong, beautiful, capable, wise and have so much to offer. I didn’t believe that at all.

Life beats you down sometimes as a kid and if you don’t believe the right things, you get in that place and that’s where I was. The advice I would’ve said to myself is tell somebody and talk through it because I probably wouldn’t have married that man. I love my three children. My three daughters are amazing. They’re the best gifts I have. However, the heartache, the difficulty and the struggles that I’ve had, I know that I am the woman I am now because I fought out of that mindset. Years ago, I would have said to Erica at 23 years old, four months from getting married, I would have said, “Run like hell. Get away from him and run,” because that would have been a totally different trajectory.

There are many wonderful and amazing things in my life. My strength, grit, willingness to persevere, example I set for my daughters, the hard work ethic that I have and determination, I know were shaped by that but I also know that’s who I am at my core and it would’ve come out anyways. That’s the advice I would have given myself and I say that because I realized there’s a lot of people that have made decisions in their life because of this stinking thinking in their head. They’ve made decisions and limited themselves or allowed themselves to stay in difficult situations that they should never have done.

One of the reasons I’m involved in Hope Against Trafficking, which is an organization that helps women that have come out of sex trafficking is because a lot of those women got trapped in it because of the beliefs or experiences they had as a kid. If I can help people transform that false belief they have about themselves and know their value and their worth that they were created with a purpose and they are created by a God who loves them, that they can transform that mindset. There’s no limit to what they can do. That’s probably what I would have told myself because it’s so important to me to help people know who they are. That’s part of who I am.

We’re going to take these statements and we’re going to put these up for you. That’s a very important thing that fear and not trusting yourself. We are so worried about the external factors and I think people need to understand that it could be a good help with business. It could be your boss, an employee, a friend, it could be anything and help them to trust intuition. You go to do that stuff. I think that’s a phenomenal lesson. I appreciate that. As hard as it is to talk about it, I think it’s a very strong point. One last thing. Who or what is your biggest inspiration? You mentioned your mother that you wanted to be or your father.

When you need it, the right house will appear. You have to be patient. Trust your Realtor.

My mom and my dad are. With International Women’s Day, I was asked that same question. That’s a tough one. There are so many people that have influenced me. I would say mom is a typical answer. It’s a hard one. Honestly, my mom is one and my grandma’s the other. It’s hard to choose between the two.  My grandma, Phyllis, birthed eleven kids, raised twelve, buried one, had 41 grandchildren, now has over 30 great-grandchildren. She passed away a few years ago. My grandpa passed away a few years ago before her but the legacy that they’ve left, the poise, strength and anything. She shared the life lessons that she learned growing up, sewing all of her clothes and all of her brother’s clothes.

I’ve got my mom who said she was going to do it and it was done. She was intentional, determined and an influencer. I spoke at her funeral and there were probably 400 people there. I got texts and emails for months after like, “I didn’t know she passed. I would have been there,” because she had such an impact. Those two women probably have impacted my life the most. I hear their words in my head a lot of times when I’m talking to my kids, when I’m talking to myself and reminding me to live beyond myself.

My grandma used to always say, “If you’re ever in a bad mood, go help somebody else. Find somebody who’s in the worse condition than you, help them and serve them.” My mom loved the starfish story. I know we’re running out of time but the starfish story is one of the most amazing stories. It’s about the impact you make on other people and making a difference. Never think that you can’t have an impact in this world because even one life that you impact for the better, you’re making a difference.

I’ll say this one last thing that she taught me, which is the Law of 250. On average, every person will come in contact and impact 250 people in their lifetime. Jordan, you’ll go impact 250 people, make a good impact on 250 people. When I interact with you, when I’m in my friendship and talking with you, if I can remember that after you leave me, you’re going to go impact 250 other people. What influence do I want to make on you? Do I want to leave you better or worse to go impact those 250? It’s a ripple effect. However, I treat one person, that now has the potential to go impact 250 other people in the world. If I can remember that, how I relate to other people, in relationship with other people and think about that impact, it changes how I live. It helps to shape how I live for the better.

To sum this up. We are here to serve other people. No matter what we do whether it’s a personal friend or our job, forget about money. It’s about serving other people. How could you help them? When we impact them, how many other people can they impact? It keeps on going.

I will say, Jordan, you are a great example of that. Both with this show that you’re choosing to find people that have inspiration in their life and have probably inspired you, impacted you and you’re wanting to share their stories with people. I remember when I was at the gym, sometimes I’d say to myself, “If Jordan can do it, I can do it,” because I know what you’ve overcome. You absolutely have that impact on other people and you influence other people. You walk into a room and you’re positive and you’re looking for solutions. You’re helping them be better and you’re always looking to serve. It’s one of the reasons I love CrossFit Bloomfield. You definitely have a heart for your clients and have a heart for the members to help them be their best. It does create a culture and an atmosphere there that people love to be at. You are living what you’re seeking to share with others.

Thank you. I appreciate that. We’re all helping each other out. That’s really what it is all about. Sharing everybody’s story, letting other people know about it and letting other people hear it, that you can help other people, that makes our day. Here’s my plan. I would like to be able to do this again with you and see where we are.

I’d love that. That’d be great.

Thank you. I’ll see you at the gym.

Thank you very much for having me. I’ll be at the gym soon.

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About Erica Kohler

AGT 16 | Residential RealtorAs a southeast Michigan native, Erica currently resides in Beverly Hills, Michigan with her three daughters. As the daughter of real estate brokers, she grew up in and around the real estate industry, assisting her parents, who were broker-owners, which has given her invaluable experience of the intricate details that it takes to make a successful and seamless real estate transaction.

She is a proud graduate of Cranbrook Kingswood and Oakland University, with dual degrees in psychology and education. She has held her real estate license since 1996. After taking several years to be home and focused on her children, as they grew, she returned to her career in real estate. As a realtor, She is committed to creating an exquisite, reliable, and seamless transaction experience that exceeds her client’s expectations.

She has found a unique niche working with divorced or divorcing individuals, as an advocate during a very tumultuous time, taking her own experience through abuse and divorce and using it to help others who find themselves in a similar situation.